The Best Career and College Advice for ESFPs from 3 Successful ESFPs

 

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ESFP stands for Extraverted Sensing Feeling Perceiving. ESFPs make up 9% of the general population, and are the third most common (10%) type among women and the seventh most common (7%) type among men. ESFPs are fun-loving and like being the center of attention. They are energetic and social, and love being entertained as much as they love entertaining others.  While ESFPs are warm and friendly, their reluctance to be serious often makes it difficult to get close to them.

Suspect you are an ESFP? Whether it’s food, music, nature, or people, you’re the kind of person that simply loves enjoying the world around you. While you love having fun, you enjoy nothing more than ensuring that everyone else is having as good a time as you are. You prefer avoiding conflict, particularly if it involves you. You sometimes revert to joking or being less serious when faced with situations or topics you’d rather avoid. If much of this is starting to sound familiar, it’s likely you’re an ESFP.

Some famous ESFPs include: Marilyn Monroe, Elvis Presley, Ronald Reagan, Katy Perry, Will Smith, Paul McCartney, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Elizabeth Taylor.

Looking for the best schools for this personality type? We’ve surveyed thousands of programs and ranked them in our personality-type college rankings. Check out the ranking of the 25 best schools for ESFPs here.

 

Interviewee 1:head_two
Age: 40

Gender: M
Location: Hazleton, Pa

Job Title: Newspaper reporter

 

Q: Can you tell us a little bit about your educational history?
A: I went to a small college in Pennsylvania, majored in business. Dropped out after 3 years. Went back to school 10 years later, got that degree.

Q: What is your current position at work?
A: Newspaper reporter.

 

Q: Do you feel like your education was a good fit for your personality?
A:  It helped. I really had no long term goals when I got out of high school, so I tried school for a while, then joined the WWE (pro wrestling), one of their lesser divisions and became a “heel.” That’s a pro-wrestling term for a villain. Long story short, I eventually appeared in many major arenas as a so called manager. The story lines had me being beaten up, hit with chairs. It was part of the script. I made good money and I enjoyed the spotlight but I started thinking, is this what I want to do with my life? And I was getting injured too much. So I left, had a 10 year pension, went back to school. And eventually took this job.

Q: Do you feel like your current role at work is a good fit for your personality?
A:  100 percent yes. I am out in the community. I break stories, get headlines. And I do a lot of community work. Unlike most of the people I work with I’ve been on stage so I volunteer to do things in the public eye. I’m good in front of a camera. A real showman.

Q: What are strengths in work and school that you’ve gained from your personality?
A: I am such an extrovert I think it makes people sick. But as a reporter, I’ve used my instincts to get sources to trust me. I’m an upfront, in your face, get the job done kind of guy. Those are good qualities for a reporter, since I have to get assignments done every day, in a timely manner.

Q: What are weaknesses in work and school that you’ve felt due to your personality?

A: The things that are my strengths, annoy people. I’m always “on” it seems. I need the spotlight to be on me and that really turns some people off, but it’s who I am and I’m not going to change. Another weakness is, I live in the now. Not too good at planning more than a week ahead at things.

 

Interviewee 2:head
Age:   29                             Gender: F                           Location: New Mexico
Job Title: Drug counselor (work with judges at the court of common pleas level)

Q: Can you tell us a little bit about your educational history?
A: Went to U. of Texas, majored in Psychology. Earned Masters in Psych.

Q: What is your current position at work?
A: Drug and alcohol counselor. Work with individuals who have been convicted, but who are given the option to go into counseling rather than serve hard time in jail. Judges make that decision. We work with those judges.

Q: Do you feel like your education was a good fit for your personality?

A: A good question. I never really thought about what I wanted to do. Some kind of social services, since my mother was an R.N. and growing up, she loved what she did. But my primary motivation in anything I did, even in school picking classes is, “Did it excite me? If I take this course, will I be bored?”

Q: Do you feel like your current role at work is a good fit for your personality?

A: I’m still learning. Every day is different. But I get excited by things that are new and that kinda fits my job description. Exciting isn’t the word. Scary? On edge? I deal with people who are motivated to end their addictions or (sometimes) just avoid jail time. A lot of these people are not very nice. Is my job thrilling? You bet.


Q: What are strengths in work and school that you’ve gained from your personality?

A: Though I may focus more on the present experience than other types, it’s not a 100 percent thing, and not on the present all the time. I’m also quite strong on Fi, Fi has a lot of the future focus too. Also, gotta say I am not in full Se mode very often. I’m usually in a blend of the present and the future. As a counselor I have to be an eternal optimist, seeing in my patients a brighter future for them.

Q: What are weaknesses in work and school that you’ve felt due to your personality?

A: My need for recognition in a job where my colleagues frown upon that. I don’t often speak it out loud, but since this is anonymous… when I conclude that someone is no longer in need of my service and a judge or someone praises me, I like it. I need it. Maybe I shouldn’t think that way, and I don’t often express that need, but it’s important to me. My job energizes me. My work too. It’s good to be recognized for my successes too. Is it a weakness? As a counselor, maybe.

 

Interviewee #3:head_two
Age: 38           

Gender: M
Location: New York City                                            

 Job Title: Music, fine arts teacher

Q: Can you tell us a little bit about your educational history?
A: Degree in education. Always intended to be in the arts, teach arts, music

Q: What is your current position at work?
A: In the fine arts department at a major prep school in New York City  

Q: Do you feel like your education was a good fit for your personality?

A: It was to a degree. I thought I might teach someday and perform in a rock band or play classical piano for a living. But things turned out opposite. I teach and that takes up a lot of time. I hate the structure of curricula but being in the music and drama department, I am allowed to be creative with my students.

Q: Do you feel like your current role at work is a good fit for your personality?

I wish I had the time to perform more. I do recitals (I play piano), and I do act in a NYC theatrical group and someday I’ll perform even more. But I teach for a living and it is very satisfying to help others. I tend not to think long term for myself, but for the kids in my group, I can intuitively sense someone with real talent and that’s really exciting.

Q: What are strengths in work and school that you’ve gained from your personality?

A: My art. My ability to teach and inspire others. We had a student go on to sing in the Metropolitan Opera. I have played in a band. Schooling just gave me the chance to perfect my skills that I had. My mentor, when I was less than 10 taught me a lot. School taught me to be a professional. I compose music on instinct. All that, I’ve since learned fits well into my ESFP traits.

Q: What are weaknesses in work and school that you’ve felt due to your personality?

A: I have to adhere to a teaching plan. That’s the hard news. But our whole department is made up of musicians so we give ourselves latitude. We all perform. We all are highly creative. It’s a good atmosphere. But there is standard stuff all teachers in NY State have to do.