Best Career and College Advice from ENFJs from Three Successful ENFJs

ENFJ

ENFJs are one of the rarest of personality types, representing a mere (estimated) 2-to-3 percent of the population. ENFJ stands for Extravert, iNtuitive, Feeling, Judging. They have an outgoing personality and enjoy spending time with other people. Being in social settings helps them feel energized. Not surprisingly, ENFJs are often attracted to leadership roles (see Obama, Reagan, below); they naturally organize people to take advantage of their unique talents. They often have a strong vision in their work, and enjoy being able to use their creativity to develop innovative initiatives with a humanitarian focus. ENFJs appreciate teamwork, and they want to have the organizational resources to put their ideas into action.

Work: ENFJs seem to do best in careers where they get to interact with others and help people in some defined way…counselors, teachers, politicians (see below). Some famous ENFJs are Barack Obama, Bono, Denzel Washington, Jennifer Lawrence, Pope John Paul II, Michael Jordan, Nelson Mandela, and Ronald Reagan.

Looking for the best schools for this personality type? We’ve surveyed thousands of programs and ranked them in our personality-type college rankings. Check out the ranking of the 25 best schools for ENFJs here.

Interviewee 1:head

Age: 41

Gender: M

Location: Salem, Oregon

Job Title: Doctor in Physical Therapy (DPT)

Q: Can you tell us a little bit about your educational history?

A: I attended a little known (except if you live here) school in Oregon that has a good P.T. program. That was important to me because I am someone who has always been interested in health promotion. I also have to say that the school was a Christian college, and that aspect of my education was also important to me. And I wanted to be able to earn an advanced degree to further my career. It was a good mix.

Q: What is your current position at work?

A: I am a private practice physical therapist, but also do work in conjunction with a major hospital in Salem, Oregon. What I’ve tried to do is integrate my private practice with working in a team setting at a hospital. I do see myself as someone who relishes a take-charge position, but working with colleagues is enormously satisfying (internally and emotionally). I think I have the best of both worlds, which I suppose is indicative of my personality type.

Q: Do you feel like your education was a good fit for your personality?

A: 100 percent yes. My teachers at the university pretty much recognized my potential (maybe more than I did as a freshman) and I fit in well in their departments. I eventually became v.p. of my graduating class in my senior year.

Q: Do you feel like your current role at work is a good fit for your personality?

A: Yes. I do. As I explained at length in an earlier question, I have a strong idea about how to deal with patients, but I am always open to conferences with colleagues if I’m stumped. Sometimes I can be demanding of others, but no more than I am with myself: my harshest critic is me. I always tell that to others when I’m in conference. [I Skype a lot with doctors around the country.]

Q: What are strengths in work and school that you’ve gained from your personality?

A: My total focus on my patients. That was developed in school, where I made it known, pretty early on that I wanted to be a P.T. and go for my doctorate. It’s a long haul, but no one can stop me when my mind is set. So I did it.

Q: What are weaknesses in work and school that you’ve felt due to your personality?

A: Having a tendency to spread myself too thin. Take on more than I can chew. But I am aware of that, so I try to not spread myself too thin. LOL. Also, particularly when I started out, I was way too emotional at home, after work…not sure I’m over that. I care so much about my patients that when I see a rough case, where someone is really hurt and struggling, it hits me hard. I’m very empathetic, which is why I try so damned hard to help people get through their therapy.

Interviewee 2:head_two

Age: 31

Gender: F

Location: Richmond, Va.

Job Title: Social worker, case worker

Q: Can you tell us a little bit about your educational history?

A: I have a master’s degree in sociology. All through school I had a lot of positive, optimistic energy and (forgive me if I sound holier than thou) so I set out to see if I

could make the world, or at least my little part of the world, a better place. At first, I went to a large state college that had a highly rated undergraduate STEM

program. Figured I’d change the world that way, through science or mathematics. Nope. I had to take a 180 degree turn and transfer out. It was only when I switched majors (and schools) and got involved with the social sciences did I feel fulfilled.

Q: What is your current position at work?

A: Children and youth case load worker. I often deal with suspected child abuse. It can be gut wrenching and emotionally draining. I can see myself moving into an administrative position someday.

Q: Do you feel like your education was a good fit for your personality?

A: Sure. I was an early childhood education major; that is, after a lost year at a technical school. Believe it or not, I fully intending to go into some kind of computer work when I entered my freshman year. Turns out that was just not for me. What a mistake that first year was. Later on, after transferring to another school, as part of my coursework, I (should say we, the class) did incredible amounts of field work in schools, on varying levels of involvement. I was usuallyin kindergarten classes. That fit me to a T. For a long time it was a toss-up between teacher or social work. Working with kids beat working with computers; at least for me.

Q: Do you feel like your current role at work is a good fit for your personality?

A: Yes. But I do want to move into a leadership role someday.

Q: What are strengths in work and school that you’ve gained from your personality?

A: By my junior year at school and then later in my career I found that I have the gift of being able to relate. As a social worker, meaningful communication is a major piece of my life’s work. Indeed for me, it’s a major vehicle for personal growth. I’m good at working with people, helping them to improve their behavior and their lives. One of my teachers at school described me as someone who cares, who has an uncanny sense for knowing what others need or what they are about. That clicked with me. I think from then on I knew my work had to involve helping children who couldn’t help themselves.

Q: What are weaknesses in work and school that you’ve felt due to your personality?

A: As a child and youth case worker I have to constantly be aware of my own feeling of becoming so emotionally involved that I lose sleep and burn out fast! I want to be true to my personality, which I think is best suited to social work, but I’ve almost left the profession because seeing such suffering just sickens me and makes my heart ache. I like what I do, but it can be highly stressful.

Interviewee #3:head

Age: 25

Gender: F

Location: Lincoln, Nebraska

Job Title: Elementary school teacher

Q: Can you tell us a little bit about your educational history?

A: I didn’t know what I wanted to do until late in my senior high school year. After graduation I was stuck between being interested in two professions: working at a daycare facility, maybe someday managing or even owning one, or becoming a teacher. I went to a state university not really knowing what direction I would take. The first semester I was SO unhappy and decided I wanted to change my concentration immediately to Early Childhood Education. Now I’m about to start teaching third grade and I don’t have any second guesses. Follow your gut feeling!

No regrets.

Q: What is your current position at work?

A: Elementary school teacher

Q: Do you feel like your education was a good fit for your personality?

A: I wanted to do some meaningful things in my life. I almost made the mistake (for me) of going into a field that might not have fit my personality. I always thought I might be a teacher someday, but the idea of teaching high school kids, I think scared me a bit. But young kids, we just hit it off. And I’m happy now.

Q: Do you feel like your current role at work is a good fit for your personality?

A: I hope so. I’m very satisfied working with young kids and dealing with their parents. I wanted to make a difference in people’s lives and how better to do that than by helping to shape children in their most formative years.

Q: What are strengths in work and school that you’ve gained from your personality?

A: What I learned in school is that children like me and vice versa. I’m not married (hope to be someday) but I want kids. Now I have 20 new kids every year. And the parents, they feel comfortable talking to me and sharing their most inner thoughts and fears.

Q: What are weaknesses in work and school that you’ve felt due to your personality?

A: Have you heard this from other ENFJs? I want to change the world for the better. Make a mark. When I was a student, some people just called me crazy because I’m incredibly passionate about humanity and very open with my emotions. But my professors said my passion would serve me well in my later years as a teacher, or whatever field I went into. And they were right. I get along well with the other teachers on staff. And although there is a strict curriculum (my weakness, not comfortable with that), I still get a chance to alter the coursework, thanks to my relationship with my supervisor.

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