Best Career and College Advice for ESFJs from 3 Successful ESFJs

ESFJ

ESFJ stands for Extraverted Sensing Feeling Judging. Of the Myers-Briggs personality types, ESFJ is the second most common personality type (12% of the population). 17 % of women are estimated to be of this personality type; 8% of men. Highly in tune with the emotions of those around them, ESFJs are outgoing and are usually eager to help support others whenever possible. Manners and moral codes are frequently important to ESFJs, and they may find themselves judging those who do not conform to behavior they deem appropriate. Loyalty is important to them.

If you are altruistic and frequently take the burdens of others upon your shoulders, you just might be an ESTJ. You trend towards leadership roles based on organizational skills, such as coordinator or event planner. You value guidelines, and believe that everyone should play by the same rules. If these traits sound familiar, you might be an ESFJ.

Work: ESFJs like to work with others, particularly in a team situation where everyone is similarly motivated, conscientious, and supportive of each other.

Some famous ESFJs include: Sam Walton, Ray Kroc (McDonald’s), Larry King, Chris Wallace, Prince William, Vince Diesel, Ariana Grande, and Leslie Stahl.

Looking for the best schools for this personality type? We’ve surveyed thousands of programs and ranked them in our personality-type college rankings. Check out the ranking of the 25 best schools for ESFJs here.

Interviewee 1:head_two
Age: 24
Gender: F
Location: Boston

Job Title: Fitness trainer

Q: Can you tell us a little bit about your educational history?
A: Went to undergraduate school at UMass. Studied PT at Northeastern

Q: What is your current position at work?
A:  I work as a fitness trainer for a health club in Boston.

Q: Do you feel like your education was a good fit for your personality?
A: My post graduate work is. I’m still going to school, working getting a master’s degree in Physical Therapy, because that field is ideal for me, working with people, helping people in (I hope) a large hospital setting. My undergrad education really didn’t help with my current job as a health club trainer, because it’s all about my personality and the ease with people in groups that makes me so good at what I do.

Q: Do you feel like your current role at work is a good fit for your personality?
A: Yes. Being an extrovert, working with groups of people of all ages all with the same goals of getting fit. If you’ve ever joined a fitness club workout class, the leader, that’s me, has to be inclusive, pushing and prodding everyone to a goal of being fit (or losing weight in some cases). But to be really popular, you have to shine. Smile. Tell jokes. Motivate, and some of that can’t be taught at a school. It’s just who I am. The “E” in ESFJ is strong in me. The more people like me, want to get into my class, the better my pay.

Q: What are strengths in work and school that you’ve gained from your personality?
A: I was always a joiner. Probably should have studied more but I was inclined to be on the cheerleading squad and during spring, softball (we did well) and track. What I learned from my athletic advisors was how to work with other athletes as a team, how to help others not as skilled in one area as I was. On the softball team, I could hit. I just liked being around people, period.

Q: What are weaknesses in work and school that you’ve felt due to your personality?

A: The negative? I just liked hanging around friends rather than studying or being online doing college research. I spend a lot of time relaxing. But in my defense, as a fitness trainer, I need downtime. I’m friends with some other trainers and with a few clients and after a heavy workout, we’ll go to Starbucks and just shoot the … you know.

 

Interviewee 2:head
Age: 41        Gender: F         Location: Hopewell, Va.
Job Title: School administrator (guidance counselor)

Q: Can you tell us a little bit about your educational history?
A: I went to a small college in Virginia and then earned a psychology degree at the University of West Georgia.

Q: What is your current position at work?
A: High school guidance counselor and all around mentor.

Q: Do you feel like your education was a good fit for your personality?

A: It was essential. I never knew what I wanted to do with my life. I assumed I’d be a teacher like many of my friends, growing up, wanted to be. When I’d get together with friends to talk about our futures, teaching came up. I’m not good at the abstract, you know? The practical side of me was, yeah, sure. I’ll be a teacher, I like kids. Soon enough I realized that I would be more comfortable within a group of educators and I could help needy students one on one. That grabbed my heart. Does that make sense?

Q: Do you feel like your current role at work is a good fit for your personality?

A: Yes. Satisfies my need to help people. My extroverted personality calms my kids down and motivates them, helps them believe that my advice is worth listening to. I’m also part of a team of administrators, principal and vice principal, other guidance counselors, business manager, school board members. Team effort all the way.

Q: What are strengths in work and school that you’ve gained from your personality?

A: In large classes, with give and take, I did well. Studying on my own at home, not so good. Here’s what I know myself: I’m good working with people, particularly in group situations. As a counselor I bring teachers, parents together, to discuss a student. Then the student joins in. We all talk. My extroversion is an essential element to my ability to help kids.

Q: What are weaknesses in work and school that you’ve felt due to your personality?

A: I don’t like working alone. Anytime. Did much better in study groups and after lerning about Myers Briggs I realized this has always been a key to my ESFJ outlook on life. I don’t spend a lot of time alone on my computer. That bores me. But put me in a forum and I’m comfortable. All of this applies to both my education and my life now, at work. Before a sit down with a student, I study his records, talk with teachers about him or her. Maybe even talk with his or her parents. Talking to everyone, bringing diverse opinions together to help someone. Enormously satisfying

 

Interviewee #3:head_two
Age: 30         Gender: M
Location: Youngstown, Ohio         Job Title: shift supervisor

Q: Can you tell us a little bit about your educational history?
A: I went to community college in Ohio. I had no idea what I wanted to do.

Q: What is your current position at work?
A: I work as a day and sometimes night shift supervisor for a large manufacturer and packager of food goods.

Q: Do you feel like your education was a good fit for your personality?

A: I had an Associate’s degree. Most of the guys I work with never got a college degree of any type. I also work with retirees who need to make some extra money. My education allowed me to qualify for a supervisor’s position. I began on a production line but because I am a good organizer and a hard worker, I was promoted to night and then day shift. I supervise about 50 people. You don’t learn that in school. But I did learn to be organized and do reports. Maybe that’s not totally by the book ESFJ, but I was tested twice and I’m an ESFJ, if you’re wondering.

Q: Do you feel like your current role at work is a good fit for your personality?

A: Yes. Because it’s all about motivating a group, fitting in, being a boss in a way, but not being “bossy,” right? Someone I know once told me I wear my heart on my sleeve and I guess that means I care a lot about the team I work with and the job I have.  It’s true. And people know it.

Q: What are strengths in work and school that you’ve gained from your personality?

A: I’m very outgoing and when I’m in a group that has a similar goal like a production line (which can be boring), I’m good at making the work fun, competitive (teams versus teams). Our company provides work incentives, which engages employees. We do well as a team, we can win prizes like TVs or even smart phones.

Q: What are weaknesses in work and school that you’ve felt due to your personality?

A: When I have to sit down at a computer by myself and make out a report. Yeech. That is part of my supervisory job description but I really hate it. I did have similar problems in school when I had to study a subject on my own rather than in a study group where you could toss around ideas and solutions.

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